The Major Issues the Republican Party Faces

The Major Issues the Republican Party Faces

The Republican Party also called the Grand Old Party (GOP) is the second oldest active party in the United States of America and was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, former Liberty Party activists and Free-Soilers with the sole aim of opposing the spread of slavery and dreams of forming a united and modern America. Ripon, Wisconsin and Jackson, Michigan lay claim to the birthplace of the party. Abraham Lincoln is the first Republican to be elected President in 1861 and the GOP till date is also referred to as ‘party of Lincoln’. The party presided over the ‘American Civil War’ and ‘reconstruction’, major events which shaped America’s political and economic destiny. The color red has come to be recognized as the color of GOP though it has not been officially adopted by the party.

Republicans are known for their conservative platform – a curious blend of economic libertarianism and social conservatism leaning towards religious right. Their positions on issues of major importance are outlined below :

The support a robust version of federalism with greater limitations based on federal power and a larger role reserved for the states.
They strongly believe that making law is the prerogative of the legislature and that judiciary should not legislate from the bench, a case in point being the Roe Vs. Wade abortion ruling. Towards this end, they have supported various bills in the last decade limiting the courts ability to hear certain types of cases thereby restricting judicial activism and review.
They favor free-market system and limited government regulation. The have formulating policies supporting businesses, economic liberalism and economic freedom.
They favor lower income tax rates and believe that graduated tax rates (higher income tax rates for high income earners) unfairly target those who create jobs and wealth.
They do agree that a ‘safety net’ should be provided for those who are needy and less fortunate but

Politics of Change

Politics of Change

I am not only fascinated by politics, but by the politics of change, if there is one unchanging motif that runs through the common history of man, it is that everything changes, except change itself. How we change, and its process tells us more about who we are as nations and individuals and it is that fearful but persistent change that tells us not only who we are, but who we were and perhaps who we might be. I know many have distaste to all things political, because of the common association with corruption and scandal which pervades the political society. It is true that politics unfortunately is inhabited by desperate men and women who abuse the power entrusted to them, and many of them, not all of them are circus elephants.

But does that mean one should despair with and ignore politics?

It does surprise me that when I talk to people who are by their own right apathetic towards politics, they consider it to be some new age phenomenon, or when I speak with devout religious persons who consider that politics as it is today was not apparent in the days of the Moses, Mohammed or Guru Nanak. When people ask me why I am so interested in politics, I recall my first lesson in Government and Politics when I was 16, my lecturer Mr. McSweeny, broke politics down to “who gets what says who”. Who gets what says who in society and on this planet should be a concern of everyman or woman who has a life to lead and a family to feed.

To ignore politics is to test that old French proverb ” if you do not do politics, politics will certainly do you”. As Aristotle observed, one of the many penalties of refusing to engage in politics is to allow yourself to be ruled be inferior individuals than yourself.

That is why I always pay close attention to the politics of today, simple labels immersed in complex situations always require the closest attention, lest one be girded in the whirlwind of propaganda, where the myths are legion and the truth of the