Terrorism Law Held Constitutional

look at your life, your plans for your future, and especially your plans for the protection of your family, your identities, and your financial stability. Are you safe?

Imagine this not-so-unimaginable scenario: A police officer pulls up to a house where a domestic disturbance has been reported. As the officer approaches the house, a man wielding a gun bursts out the front door, aims his weapon at the officer, and screams, “I’m going to kill you!” The officer has no place to take cover. What would a reasonable law enforcement official do in such a situation?In the Introduction ” We the people of the Unites States” are introduced as ordainer’s of the constitution, but none of the participators were elected by people as they had been chosen to revise the confederation article, furthermore the final edition never passed a referendum or masses acceptance thus the claim seems to be null.

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jurisprudence


Saying 'radical Islam' has nothing to do with defeating terrorism
“Radical Islamic terrorism.” Apparently, the phrase — if you can actually say it — has mystical powers. At Tuesday's Republican debate, the candidates once more took pains to point out that they would speak the dreaded words that President Obama and …
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3 thoughts on “Terrorism Law Held Constitutional”

  1. 4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An excellent outline of how these groups and their jihad has developed, in question and answer format., August 6, 2015
    By 
    lyndonbrecht (Tampa Bay area) –

    This review is from: Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement: What Everyone Needs to Know® (Paperback)
    Again five stars for a good book, but “I love it” seems inappropriate given the serious nature of what is covered. This is another in the series “What everyone needs to know.” The format is question and answer, and if you read all the way through, you’ll find some repetition.

    One thing the book does well is ground these things in context. All have in common the jihad against the Soviets in Afghanistan, doubly targets for being invaders and for official atheism. The Soviets lost 15,000 soldiers killed and 50,000 wounded and a million Afghanis died with 5 million more becoming refugees. In that chaos a lot of future chaos was born, with the additional fact that then, we Americans supplied the jihadis with weapons and support, much of it channeled through Pakistan. Byman does say that CIA funding for bin Laden is a myth.

    The Muslim world is badly split. Some fervent believers call other fervent believers godless pagans and the insult is rather important. Muslim regions have historically seen periodic episodes of militant fundamentalists trying to recreate the supposed golden days of the early Islamic community. This context is important; however violent and media-savvy the Islamic State may be, it is a variation on an old theme.

    Also worth noting is that as serious as jihadist terrorism has been for the US and other countries, the main victims are other Muslims. The 1990s war in Algeria between the government and fundamentalists saw 200,000 deaths. There’s also some worldly activity going on. The Islamic State is actually running cities, as well as killing unbelievers. Al Qaeda members get 1 month vacation per year, plus 15 sick days. These people are businesslike as they push terrorism as a tactic. After you read this short book you’ll understand better the relationships among the personnel and movements up to the present.

    Byman’s point is that historical context helps in understanding what these groups are and why they are doing what they are doing. As I read the book I was reminded of past readings about the Mafia; terrorism is a business technique. Byman does not pull any punches; these are dangerous and ruthless groups. He calls for understanding context as likely to lead to more effective dealing with them, not for sympathy.

    Many readers will find Chapter 9 the most interesting in the book, on counterterrorism. There is also a short but rather good bibliographic essay.

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  2. 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Questions you’ve never thought to ask about Al Qaeda, October 8, 2015
    By 
    Pope Ward (Chevy Chase, MD) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement: What Everyone Needs to Know® (Paperback)
    The question/answer format of this book is especially useful for the layman. You can read the book straight through or you can go to the questions that interest you most without worrying about missing a larger argument. Byman isn’t trying to convince us of a different way of thinking about Al Qaeda. He is trying to answer a set of fundamental questions in a readable way.

    A scan of the table of contents is just as likely to turn up a question you’ve always wondered about (“Where does Al Qaeda get its money?” or “What was Al Qaeda’s relationship with the Taliban before 9-11?”) as an interesting question you’ve never thought to ask (“What was Al Qaeda doing in Sudan?” or “Who are the key thinkers jihadists admire and read?”). As interesting as the questions are, sometimes the value is in the answers. In the first ten pages, for example, Byman dispels the myth that the CIA funded Bin Laden in Afghanistan.

    Especially as ISIS emerges as a rival for our attention, its important to have an understanding of where Al Qaeda came from and what it is today. I highly recommend Byman’s overview as an engaging place to start.

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  3. 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Good question and answer set, December 7, 2015
    By 
    C. Townsend (Oahu, HI) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    I enjoyed the book. The book reads as a list of questions and answers. The answers are very well written and detailed. The book ranges from very basic questions about the groups that your Grandma might ask across the dinner table to more in-depth conversations from those who are knowledgeable on the subject. Readers who want to understand more about the primary actors in modern extremist movements can read the book straight through or bounce around to whatever questions pique their curiosity.

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