Senator Feingold Has Constitutional Opportunity

Convention that has the single mission of making Congress obey the Constitution and call the first convention; it does not advocate for any specific amendments.

So, please Senator Feingold, as a true reformer and chair of the Senate’s Constitution Subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee, take the opportunity to address the disappointing and nasty illegal behavior of Congress. Even more disturbing than people becoming senators without being elected to that high office, something impermissible for House Representatives, is this violation of Article V. Please shift your attention to getting Congress to call the first Article V convention by introducing a joint resolution demanding that action. This would require only a simple majority vote in both houses, in contrast to the two-thirds majority needed for a joint resolution proposing an amendment.

Also, implore President Obama, a former constitutional law professor, to publicly support making Congress, finally, obey the Constitution. This is surely a case of better late than never. For more than empty lip service to the principle that no one is above the law Congress must obey the supreme law of the land and honor the Article V provision for the convention option. This is necessary for credible, law-abiding American democracy. Justice demands this. Without fixing this problem there is even more reason for citizens to have little confidence in Congress and government as a whole.

[Contact Joel S. Hirschhorn through http://delusionaldemocracy.com.]


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3 thoughts on “Senator Feingold Has Constitutional Opportunity”

  1. 18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The U.S. Constitution for Dummies, May 1, 2012
    By 

    I received a complimentary copy of this book in order to
    review it.

    This books was short and to the point, the main point being that those who don’t know their rights may one day be in danger of losing them. The author speaks in clear English to translate the flowery, more eloquent speech used to write the United States Constitution. He gives a glossary of definitions so that we know exactly what the words mean, rather than leaving them open for interpretation. I think the thing I like most about this book is that it doesn’t attempt to interpret the Constitution for us. He doesn’t tell us what he thinks the words mean, or what politicians or other influential members of society think the words mean. He gives us literal definitions and allows us to interpret the context based upon those definitions. He stays very apolitical. He also gives some interesting context about what was going on behind the scenes at the time that led to certain parts being included in the Constitution to begin with. He quotes the Federalist Papers and other documents written at the time so that we can see the debate that went on about why to word a particular article one way as opposed to another. That in particular was very enlightening for me. This book is a quick, easy read. And it is one that I will read again and again, and use to teach my children about their rights in this greatest nation on Earth.

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  2. 9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Vital data on our Bill of Rights, April 14, 2012
    By 
    software geek (san diego, ca United States) –

    I always thought that my childhood education was generally pretty decent on American History, especially compared to the current, youngest generation. I also believed I knew the Constitution and its Bill of Rights fairly well. And while I knew parts of it well, I certainly didn’t know all of it, nor the history that preceded and led to these rights. I came the realize that none of this was at all arbitrary. These rights were well thought out by the Founders and even the exact wording was given much consideration to get it correct. Mr. Clouden discusses each right in detail by giving its historical background that led to it, listing out the amendment itself and also, and very importantly, gives the definitions to key words of each amendment so that they are not misunderstood. The book also includes a thorough glossary.

    I only wish each representative of Congress, each judge and justice and the President and Vice President of the United States would study this book and the Constitution. They all swear an Oath to the Constitution but what good is that if they don’t know what is in it.

    Mr. Clouden also challenges us. With great knowledge comes great responsibility. It is OUR Bill of Rights. We need to take ownership of it and get others up to the same level of understanding. Freedom is a wonderful thing but along with it seems to be a constant battle to protect it from being snatched away. It really shouldn’t be that way, but current reality and history demonstrates that we have to continually fight to keep it.

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  3. 7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Historical Background — Know Your Bill of Rights, March 20, 2012
    By 
    Richard

    Know Your Bill of Rights does an excellent job to provide both a “basic” and “complete” historical context for the Bill of Rights. This is very well researched and documented, explaining the original intent, the historical context and the debates that preceded the drafting of the different items in the Bill of Rights, and then some of the ongoing historical evolution. The author extensively cites many viewpoints and concerns of a variety of historical figures that have been part of the discussion for these issues. The author brings a factual discussion of the history and debate(S)and avoids personal interpretation or opinion. This provides extensive background. As a result it is ideal for providing a full context of the many interpretations and debates that we see referencing the ammendments in “The Bill of Rights”. Definitely a must-read for those wanting a more complete understanding of history concerning the Bill of Rights.

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